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Wellington City Matariki Art Initiative


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Wellington City Matariki Art Initiative


Wellington will formally make Matariki a major city celebration in 2018
Mayor Justin Lester has announced

The culture that surrounds Matariki is in art & creativity

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brief


Matariki • Wellington City & Region

brief


Matariki • Wellington City & Region

Matariki is the Māori name for the cluster of stars also known as the Pleiades. It rises in mid-winter – late May or early June. For many Māori, it heralds the start of a new year.

The constellation was important for navigation and timing the seasons. The first rising of the Pleiades and of Rigel (Puanga in northern Māori, Puaka in southern Māori) occurs just prior to sunrise in late May or early June. The actual time for the celebration of Matariki varies, some iwi (tribe or clan) celebrate it immediately, others wait until the rising of the next full moon, or the dawn of the next new moon—and others use the rising of Puanga/Rigel in a similar way.

In traditional times, Matariki was a season to celebrate and to prepare the ground for the coming year. Offerings of the produce of the land were made to the gods, including Rongo, god of cultivated food. This time of the year was also a good time to instruct young people in the lore of the land and the forest. In addition, certain birds and fish were especially easy to harvest at this time.

The name Matariki is used also for the central star in the cluster, with the surrounding stars named Tupu-a-nuku, Tupu-a-rangi, Waiti, Waita, Waipuna-a-rangi and Ururangi.

Matariki literally means the ‘eyes of god’ (mata ariki) or ‘little eyes’ (mata riki). According to myth, when Ranginui, the sky father, and Papatūānuku, the earth mother, were separated by their children, the god of the winds, Tāwhirimātea, became so angry that he tore out his eyes and threw them into the heavens.

 
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schedule


schedule


draft schedule

#1 / #2

• official exhibition opening & ceremony
/ hosted by WCC
• formal dinner / Matariki celebration
/ hosted by primary sponsor

#3

• Maori business network - seminar
/ hosted by TPK

Gallery Opening - Toi Poneke

#4 / #5

• performance & short films
/ hosted by sponsor
& Te Papa / Nga Taonga

Gallery Opening - Pataka

#6

• artists seminars
/ hosted by Pataka Gallery
/ hosted by Toi Poneke
/ hosted by Dowse Gallery

Gallery Opening - Dowse Art

#7 - Full Moon

• guest speaker - TBA
/ hosted by PNBST

• schools exhibition & student awards
/ hosted by TPK

• concert (Fireworks)
/ hosted by WCC

 
 
 
 
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background


Matariki • Wellington City & Region

background


Matariki • Wellington City & Region

Matariki is the Māori name for the cluster of stars also known as the Pleiades. It rises in mid-winter – late May or early June. For many Māori, it heralds the start of a new year.

The constellation was important for navigation and timing the seasons. The first rising of the Pleiades and of Rigel (Puanga in northern Māori, Puaka in southern Māori) occurs just prior to sunrise in late May or early June. The actual time for the celebration of Matariki varies, some iwi (tribe or clan) celebrate it immediately, others wait until the rising of the next full moon, or the dawn of the next new moon—and others use the rising of Puanga/Rigel in a similar way.

In traditional times, Matariki was a season to celebrate and to prepare the ground for the coming year. Offerings of the produce of the land were made to the gods, including Rongo, god of cultivated food. This time of the year was also a good time to instruct young people in the lore of the land and the forest. In addition, certain birds and fish were especially easy to harvest at this time.

The name Matariki is used also for the central star in the cluster, with the surrounding stars named Tupu-a-nuku, Tupu-a-rangi, Waiti, Waita, Waipuna-a-rangi and Ururangi.

Matariki literally means the ‘eyes of god’ (mata ariki) or ‘little eyes’ (mata riki). According to myth, when Ranginui, the sky father, and Papatūānuku, the earth mother, were separated by their children, the god of the winds, Tāwhirimātea, became so angry that he tore out his eyes and threw them into the heavens.